Recitation of poetry is deeply regarded for expressing your true feelings. It has been observed that Urdu poets in the past used to say poetry that depicts the social, cultural surroundings of their era. Last Updated on Sunday, October 14 2018 ... Read more

Faces In The Street - Poem by Henry Lawson | Urdu Poetry

Poet : henry-lawson
Faces In The Street - Poem by Henry Lawson
They lie, the men who tell us in a loud decisive tone 
That want is here a stranger, and that misery's unknown; 
For where the nearest suburb and the city proper meet 
My window-sill is level with the faces in the street -- 
Drifting past, drifting past, 
To the beat of weary feet -- 
While I sorrow for the owners of those faces in the street. 

And cause I have to sorrow, in a land so young and fair, 
To see upon those faces stamped the marks of Want and Care; 
I look in vain for traces of the fresh and fair and sweet 
In sallow, sunken faces that are drifting through the street -- 
Drifting on, drifting on, 
To the scrape of restless feet; 
I can sorrow for the owners of the faces in the street. 

In hours before the dawning dims the starlight in the sky 
The wan and weary faces first begin to trickle by, 
Increasing as the moments hurry on with morning feet, 
Till like a pallid river flow the faces in the street -- 
Flowing in, flowing in, 
To the beat of hurried feet -- 
Ah! I sorrow for the owners of those faces in the street. 

The human river dwindles when 'tis past the hour of eight, 
Its waves go flowing faster in the fear of being late; 
But slowly drag the moments, whilst beneath the dust and heat 
The city grinds the owners of the faces in the street -- 
Grinding body, grinding soul, 
Yielding scarce enough to eat -- 
Oh! I sorrow for the owners of the faces in the street. 

And then the only faces till the sun is sinking down 
Are those of outside toilers and the idlers of the town, 
Save here and there a face that seems a stranger in the street, 
Tells of the city's unemployed upon his weary beat -- 
Drifting round, drifting round, 
To the tread of listless feet -- 
Ah! My heart aches for the owner of that sad face in the street. 

And when the hours on lagging feet have slowly dragged away, 
And sickly yellow gaslights rise to mock the going day, 
Then flowing past my window like a tide in its retreat, 
Again I see the pallid stream of faces in the street -- 
Ebbing out, ebbing out, 
To the drag of tired feet, 
While my heart is aching dumbly for the faces in the street. 

And now all blurred and smirched with vice the day's sad pages end, 
For while the short `large hours' toward the longer `small hours' trend, 
With smiles that mock the wearer, and with words that half entreat, 
Delilah pleads for custom at the corner of the street -- 
Sinking down, sinking down, 
Battered wreck by tempests beat -- 
A dreadful, thankless trade is hers, that Woman of the Street. 

But, ah! to dreader things than these our fair young city comes, 
For in its heart are growing thick the filthy dens and slums, 
Where human forms shall rot away in sties for swine unmeet, 
And ghostly faces shall be seen unfit for any street -- 
Rotting out, rotting out, 
For the lack of air and meat -- 
In dens of vice and horror that are hidden from the street. 

I wonder would the apathy of wealthy men endure 
Were all their windows level with the faces of the Poor? 
Ah! Mammon's slaves, your knees shall knock, your hearts in terror beat, 
When God demands a reason for the sorrows of the street, 
The wrong things and the bad things 
And the sad things that we meet 
In the filthy lane and alley, and the cruel, heartless street. 

I left the dreadful corner where the steps are never still, 
And sought another window overlooking gorge and hill; 
But when the night came dreary with the driving rain and sleet, 
They haunted me -- the shadows of those faces in the street, 
Flitting by, flitting by, 
Flitting by with noiseless feet, 
And with cheeks but little paler than the real ones in the street. 

Once I cried: `Oh, God Almighty! if Thy might doth still endure, 
Now show me in a vision for the wrongs of Earth a cure.' 
And, lo! with shops all shuttered I beheld a city's street, 
And in the warning distance heard the tramp of many feet, 
Coming near, coming near, 
To a drum's dull distant beat, 
And soon I saw the army that was marching down the street. 

Then, like a swollen river that has broken bank and wall, 
The human flood came pouring with the red flags over all, 
And kindled eyes all blazing bright with revolution's heat, 
And flashing swords reflecting rigid faces in the street. 
Pouring on, pouring on, 
To a drum's loud threatening beat, 
And the war-hymns and the cheering of the people in the street. 

And so it must be while the world goes rolling round its course, 
The warning pen shall write in vain, the warning voice grow hoarse, 
But not until a city feels Red Revolution's feet 
Shall its sad people miss awhile the terrors of the street -- 
The dreadful everlasting strife 
For scarcely clothes and meat 
In that pent track of living death -- the city's cruel street. 
Henry Lawson

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Urdu Poetry – Poetry is the language of heart. Emotions and feelings take the shape of words and are delivered in a poetic manner. Urdu poetry draws its existence from past 18th and 19th century which are rich in tradition and composed in various forms. Most of the Urdu poetry derives from Arabic and Persian origin. From time immemorial, Urdu poetry has been written and narrated by renowned poets of all times. Urdu poetry is enriched with such true emotions and feelings. It has been observed that Urdu poets in the past used to say poetry that depicts and highlights the social, cultural issues of their era.

The poets used Urdu poetry as a medium of expression to put their thoughts forward for the readers. The Urdu poets are known for reviving romance, culture, social & political issues in the form of Urdu poetry collections. Urdu poetry is considered as an integral part of Pakistani culture. Our history is rich with numerous poetry collections from renowned poets like Mirza Ghalib, Allama Iqbal, Mir Dard, Mir Taqi Mir, and the list goes on. Allama Iqbal and Mirza Ghalib are considered to be the flag barrier of Urdu poetry. Iqbal Urdu poetry is based on philosophy, love, and for encouraging Muslims of India. Mirza Ghalib is regarded as the greatest Urdu poets of all times. They have contributed incredibly in the form of Ghazal, Hamd, Nazm, Ruba’i, Shayari and much more. Apart from them, Mir Taqi Mir and Mir Dard are known for romantic and sad Urdu poetry. Several other maestros of Urdu Poetry have been passed who added some valuable pearls and gems to the poetic collections from time to time.

Urdu poetry has evolved and revolutionized from time to time. Previously tough Persian and Arabic words are used for narrating the Urdu poetry. Later use of simpler Urdu words have taken over and are used more oftenly. Poets like Ahmed Faraz, Parveen Shakir, Faiz Ahmed Faiz have added some valuable Urdu poetry collection that are loved and praised by masses to date. New subject matter, themes are used by new poets that has modernized Urdu Poetry. The various forms of Urdu Poetry available for the readers includes Ghazal, Hamd, Marsiya, Naat, Nazm, Qasida, Masnavi, Naat, Qawalli, Ruba’i, Shayari and much more. The poetry lovers can stock their libraries and houses with the enormous treasure of Urdu poetry. The collection of Urdu Poems in the form of Dewan and Kuliyat are preferred by those who have a taste for traditional poetry. Allama Iqbal and Mirza Ghalib have immense contribution to the Urdu poetry.

The Urdu poetry collection of Ghalib and Iqbal are researched, read and shared by masses worldwide.The modern Urdu poets possess a progressive and practical state of mind that is far from the narration of female beauty and romance. Urdu Ghazals has been associated with emotions earlier, but now the trends are changing to give it a completely new domain of expression. Many Urdu poets become popular because of their Romantic poetry include Ghazal Ahmed Faraz, Habib Jalib, Sagar Siddiqui, Muneer Niazi, Mohsin Naqvi, Farhat Abbas Shah and many others.

The archive of HamariWeb provides the evergreen Urdu poetry collection for the viewers. Some of the finest gems of Urdu Shayari are Munir Niazi, Allama Iqbal, Faiz Ahmed Faiz, Ahmed Faraz, Mirza Ghalib, Habib Jalib, Parveen Shakir, John Elia, Syed Wasi Shah to name a few. You can even search, post, read, and share the Urdu poetry based on various genres that includes Eid poetry, sad poetry, patriotic poetry, love poetry, rain poetry, mother poetry, Islamic poetry etc. People with great taste in poetry are glued to this page. Find some of the finest and latest collection of Urdu poetry on HamariWeb.